Fellowship Program

Fellowship Program

The Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) has a longstanding commitment to train fellows and junior faculty in order to develop the next generation of clinical researchers. This commitment has evolved into the creation of the DCRI Research Fellowship Training Program.

The DCRI Research Fellowship Training Program has doubled in size since 2004 and includes more than 30 postdoctoral fellows and medical students each year. Postdoctoral fellows typically complete two years of training. The philosophy of the training program is that the most successful investigators will be able to combine superior knowledge in their field of clinical specialty with quantitative principles in an interactive, teamwork-oriented environment.

Fellowship Participants

The DCRI’s 2017–2018 training program includes 30+ fellows from four countries (Canada, Japan, South Korea, Bulgaria and the United States) in multiple therapeutic disciplines, including cardiology, pediatrics, infectious diseases, surgery, nephrology, health services research, anesthesiology, orthopedics and pulmonology.

 

Multidisciplinary Interactions

A critical component of the training program is the interaction between the clinician researchers and statisticians. Faculty biostatisticians work closely with fellows in many different capacities.

Current DCRI Fellowship Program Research Highlights

During their fellowship at the DCRI, fellows are encouraged to work on a variety of research projects, including phase I to phase IV prospective randomized clinical trials that are coordinated by the DCRI. The following videos showcase a sample of the work our fellows have undertaken.

Watch as DCRI Fellow Jennifer Rymer, MD, MBA, discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of high-sensitivity troponin, a new assay used to rule out heart attacks or myocardial infarction.

Learn more about the research DCRI Fellow Zak Loring, MD, has conducted on guideline-directed medical therapies to treat comorbidities in patients with atrial fibrillation.